Monitoring and Evaluating Mitigation Strategies in Child Care, K-12 Schools, and Institutions of Higher Education




Use monitoring and evaluation findings to adjust your strategies

Monitoring and evaluation provides practical information for state and local health and education agencies, administrators, and evaluation professionals to make timely decisions to support health, and safety of all children, students, staff, and faculty and to promote health equity working together to ensure that people have resources to maintain and manage their physical and mental health.

When developing a monitoring and evaluation plan, education and health agencies, in collaboration, may use the example evaluation questions, indicators, and data sources below to determine a protocol and scope feasible for their situation. These are not exhaustive lists of questions, indicators, or data sources, and they may be adapted to align with community priorities and needs.

Conducting monitoring and evaluation may help child care programs, schools, and institutions of higher education examine their unique circumstances and make the best proactive decisions for their children or students, faculty, and staff, including:

  • Identify which factors help or hinder effective implementation of COVID-19 mitigation strategies to reduce the spread of the virus which causes COVID-19
  • Inform allocation of resources to effectively reduce the spread of COVID-19
  • Identify and communicate about needs for additional resources and support to effectively implement mitigation strategies
  • Understand which mitigation strategies are effective in child care programs, schools, or institutions of higher education to reduce the spread of COVID-19, to maximize the positive outcomes while minimizing related negative consequences
  • Ensure the needs of individuals at increased risk and disproportionately affected populations are met
  • Inform decision-making about strengthening, focusing, and relaxing mitigation strategies (e.g., determining the optimal schedule for cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces)
  • Assess how different populations participate in, and are affected by, mitigation strategies in child care programs, schools, or institutions of higher education to ensure the health and safety of all children or students, staff, and faculty and to promote health equity by working together to ensure that people have resources to maintain and manage their physical and mental health
  • Share data and lessons learned about practices to prevent and reduce spread of COVID-19 with key stakeholders, including local policy makers, education and health agency officials, administrators, surrounding community, families, and caregivers

 

Data sources

State and local data already being collected are potential monitoring and evaluation data sources[1]. These data may include policies (e.g., stay-at-home orders, mass gathering restrictions, education agency policies and recommendations) and administrative records (e.g., absenteeism, closures, plans for reopening). Primary data may also be collected, including from surveys developed by or for child care programs, schools, or institutions of higher education; administration surveys; interviews; focus groups; health department community surveys; and others.

 

Example questions, indicators, and data sources

Child care programs

K-12 schools

Institutions of higher education

[1] Indicators and data sources may be tailored to align with the context of the intended evaluation and local communities, including what is important and feasible to assess and what data are available. Some data may be available at the local level and may not need to be collected from child care programs independently. It is critical to maintain confidentiality and privacy of the child, staff member, or volunteer as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act.

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